Toyota

Since the Dilly, Dally, Delay & Stall Law Firms are adding their billable hours, the Toyota U.S.A. and Route 44 Toyota posts have been separated here:

Route 44 Toyota Sold Me A Lemon



Wednesday, May 10, 2017

RSN: Scott Galindez | Choose the Right Tool




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Scott Galindez | Choose the Right Tool 
President Donald Trump looks to House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin and other House congressmen in the Rose Garden after the House pushed through a health care bill, at the White House in Washington, D.C., May 04, 2017. (photo: Jabin Botsford/Getty Images/WP) 
Scott Galindez, Reader Supported News 
Galindez writes: "In every toolbox, there are a variety of tools to use in various situations. As progressives, we have a variety of instruments to choose from, depending on the situation. Some devices can be used in multiple situations, while others are better for particular circumstances." 
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Monday's Russia Hearing Was a Disaster for Trump 
Aaron Rupar, ThinkProgress 
Rupar writes: "After acting Attorney General Sally Yates testified before a Senate panel on Monday and provided troubling details about how slow the White House was to act on information its then-national security adviser may have been compromised by Russia, President Trump took to Twitter to try and tamp the whole thing down." 
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House Republicans Face Fiery Town Halls Following Healthcare Vote 
Lauren Gambino and Adam Gabbatt, Guardian UK 
Excerpt: "As House Republicans return to their districts after approving a controversial plan to dramatically reshape the country's healthcare system, activists on the left are mobilizing at town halls in an effort to save the Affordable Care Act, the 2010 law that extended coverage to millions of Americans." 
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Show Me Your Papers, Texas-Style: Lawmakers Condemn SB4 as Greatest Legislative Threat to Immigrants 
Gregorio Casar, Rafael Anchia, Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzales, Democracy Now! 
Excerpt: "Texas is facing growing criticism after the state's Republican governor, Greg Abbott, signed into law one of the nation's harshest immigration bills, SB 4. The state bans sanctuary cities and allows police officers to check the immigration status of anyone they detain." 
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ACLU Seeks Documents on Planning of Yemen Raid That Killed Navy SEAL 
Vera Bergengruen, McClatchy DC 
Bergengruen writes: "One hundred days after a Navy SEAL died during a raid on an al Qaida encampment in Yemen, the American Civil Liberties on Monday filed suit demanding that the administration make public documents explaining the legal basis for the raid and how it was planned and executed." 
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Marine One, with President Donald Trump aboard, lands at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, Wednesday, February 1, 2017. (photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)
Marine One, with President Donald Trump aboard, lands at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, Wednesday, February 1, 2017. (photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)

ACLU Seeks Documents on Planning of Yemen Raid That Killed Navy SEAL

By Vera Bergengruen, McClatchy DC
09 May 17

ne hundred days after a Navy SEAL died during a raid on an al Qaida encampment in Yemen, the American Civil Liberties on Monday filed suit demanding that the administration make public documents explaining the legal basis for the raid and how it was planned and executed.
The Jan. 29 raid, the first covert counterterrorism operation authorized by President Donald Trump, resulted in a firefight with suspected terrorists that killed 36-year-old Chief Petty Officer William “Ryan” Owens. As many as 30 civilians also might have been killed in the raid, according to local media and medicsin the region.
“We have seen that this White House cannot be trusted to give the public accurate information, which is especially critical when the president authorizes military action that kills civilians,” said Hina Shamsi, director of the ACLU National Security Project. “The administration’s explanations have little credibility, and the documents we seek are essential for public accountability when civilians are killed in the name of our national security.”
The lawsuit asks a federal court to enforce a Freedom of Information Act request the group filed in March with the departments of Defense, State and Justice as well as the Central Intelligence Agency, seeking documents and records about the raid as well as the Pentagon’s assessment of civilian casualties. The Pentagon concluded that between four and 12 civilians died in the raid, but the Britain-based human rights group Reprieve, which monitors civilian casualties of drone strikes, says it has evidence of 23 civilian deaths, including a newborn and 10 children.
One of the dead was reported to be the 8-year-old daughter of Anwar al Awlaki, a senior U.S.-born al Qaida leader who was killed by a U.S. drone strike in 2011.
Despite the deaths of civilians and Owens, the Trump administration has repeatedly insisted that the raid was a “success,” saying that 14 al Qaida members were killed and valuable intelligence seized. But news reports have disputed that assessment, quoting U.S. military officials saying that “almost everything went wrong” in a botched mission that the president gave the green light to without sufficient intelligence or ground support.
Some lawmakers have also raised doubts about the operation, with Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., calling it a “failure.”
The ACLU lawsuit also asks for information about any changes the Trump administration has made to the rules of engagement when it comes to avoiding civilian casualties, citing reports that it had exempted some areas in Yemen by classifying them as “areas of active hostilities.”
“The Obama administration had a poor transparency record about lethal strikes in Yemen, but it at least put in place safeguards aimed at protecting civilians from harm,” Shamsi said. “The public has a right to know about any exceptions the Trump administration is making to civilian protection rules generally and what really happened with this tragic operation specifically.”
In the weeks after the raid, the Pentagon launched three separate investigations into the operation. The review into Owens’ death was closed soon after. Gen. Joseph Votel, the commander of U.S. Central Command, said there was no evidence of “poor decision-making or bad judgment” related to the operation, and that the Pentagon had determined that there was “no need for an additional investigation.”
The civilian casualty assessment was also closed after concluding that between four and 12 civilians were killed during the raid.
The Pentagon also launched an aviation mishap investigation. An MV-22 Osprey, which had been sent in to evacuate the wounded from the hour-long firefight that left Owens dead, crash-landed after losing power and injured two more service members. The damaged $70 million aircraft was later destroyed by a U.S. airstrike so it would not fall into the hands of the militants, according to the Pentagon.
Owens’ father, William Owens, a retired Fort Lauderdale police officer, has questioned the planning for the mission and declined to meet with Trump when his son’s body was returned to the United States. The elder Owens is not a party to the ACLU lawsuit.
http://readersupportednews.org/news-section2/318-66/43476-aclu-seeks-documents-on-planning-of-yemen-raid-that-killed-navy-seal

Violence in Mexico's US-Fueled War on Drugs Escalates 
teleSUR 
Excerpt: "Mexico's deadly, militarized war on drugs - which has been exacerbated alongside the U.S. opiate epidemic - is seeing the rise of smaller gangs looking to control more lands for growing strong-strain poppies, leading to an intensified crackdown by the Mexican Army." 
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CO2 Emissions Soar as Alaska Heats Up 
Climate Nexus 
Excerpt: "The Alaskan tundra is releasing an increasingly large amount of CO2 due to a warmer climate, new research shows." 
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