Toyota

Since the Dilly, Dally, Delay & Stall Law Firms are adding their billable hours, the Toyota U.S.A. and Route 44 Toyota posts have been separated here:

Route 44 Toyota Sold Me A Lemon



Friday, June 16, 2017

[Jetson Daily] A Breakthrough in Sustainable Hydrogen Production




Posted: 15 Jun 2017 08:05 PM PDT
generator
A shift to using renewable sources of energy to fuel our lifestyle is a must if we want to ensure a sustainable future. But finding such sources that are reliable, scalable, affordable and eco-friendly has been a challenge. Hydrogen is certainly one such potential source, if it could be produced and stored more efficiently, and using renewable energy to do so. But all this has proven difficult. However, the company HyperSolar has recently come up with a solution, which they believe could change all that.
HyperSolar have made a breakthrough in producing low-cost, scalable, and renewable hydrogen, using polluted or dirty water as its main source. They created a device called the H2 Generator to do the job. The device is powered by sunlight, and has a solar array attached to it, meaning it doesn’t need an additional or separate array to run. The device is a “self-contained Photoelectrochemical Nanosystem” and the technology was designed in a way that mimics photosynthesis. They claim that the nanoparticle-based system they developed leads to a significantly more efficient electrolysis process compared to a system that would be powered by a separate solar unit. Since the device has the solar array attached to it, there is also very little energy loss. The entire device, including the solar array can be submerged in water.
According to HyperSolar, the device optimizes the science of water electrolysis, using sunlight to separate hydrogen from any available source of water to produce clean and environmentally friendly renewable hydrogen. To work, the H2 Generator does not need conventional electrolyzers that are energy intensive and expensive.
They are currently testing the lab-scale prototype of the H2 Generator, but they believe it could easily be scaled up and set to work turning wastewater into energy. Let’s hope this tech becomes available soon.





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